Adulting with Moyo Adio

Adulting with Moyo Adio

Adulting is a highly personal experience, yet the effects of it are hardly ever limited to the individual experiencing it. It spills over, to our family, friends, and sometimes those we least expect it to. This is something that played on my mind when I decided to interview Moyo Adio. “I wouldn’t say I’m the best person for this”, says Moyo, “don’t think many people will gain much from my ‘adulting’ process.” “Let the readers be the judge of that.” I reply.

Damilola Ayo-Vaughan: Tiredness, responsibility, pressure. What do these means for you in terms of you becoming an adult?

MA: Tiredness, definitely. When I was younger I didn’t have access to stuff like social media and the stuff, so I didn’t have much to do so I didn’t lose that much energy, but now social media, and we didn’t have that many hours of school, it was just to come back from school with little or no assignments, but now you need to use your head, you need to use everything (he laughs). I also feel like you have more responsibilities, more expectations to live up to, with going to university and all that.

A common theme in all those things for you seems to be school. Do you feel like school seems to capture all those 3 things?

MA: Yeah living up to your expectations, you know you want to be somewhere at a particular point in your life, or you know what you want to achieve and school is a big factor in all of that.

 In terms of where you are in your life, with university applications, how do you feel about that?

MA: Well, the universities I applied to I’m quite sure that I should get a conditional offer but that’s not the end, I still have to work hard to meet the certain requirements, which is not going to come easy, I have to study hard for them, and that increased the pressure on me and the pressure my parents put on me, and the expectations people have for me. I have a lot of people looking up to me that I can’t let down. I have two younger sisters and it won’t be good for me to lay a really bad foundation for them, I don’t want to set a bad example for them. I want to encourage them to know that even though A-Levels are hard you can still do it and still come out successfully.

 So for you then a big part of becoming an adult involves you having to control your image, and try to be a role model?

MA: Yes, that is another part of the pressure. You also have to be a good role model to people looking up to you, especially your siblings, so they don’t go through the wrong path.

I have a lot of people looking up to me that I can’t let down. I have two younger sisters and it won’t be good for me to lay a really bad foundation for them. I don’t want to set a bad example for them. I want to encourage them to know that even though A-Levels are hard you can still do it and still come out successfully.

You spoke about social life, what you think about that in terms of becoming an adult for you?

MA: Obviously you have to have a social life. No man is an island. You need people, you can’t just be on your own. You never know what you will need somebody for, so have to have a social life. All work and no play make Jack a dull boy.

 What do you enjoy abut becoming an adult?

MA: Well I feel like I’m closer to achieving my dream.

 What’s your dream?

MA: To become an investment banker in a top investment bank in the UK, and partner by maybe 45. I enjoy the freedom, obviously, and being able to make my own decisions and people not making my own decision for me like before where my parents would have to make decisions for me, but now I feel like I have more free will to do whatever I feel is right for me. So, whatever happens, I can’t blame it on anyone else, but myself. Instead of saying ‘oh someone made this decision for me’ is all on my now. I really like the fact that you get more respect, people take you more seriously. But coming from Nigeria I won’t say freedom is really perk of being an adult, cause I’ve noticed that most Nigerians of this generation, but like 15/16, what most 18 year-olds do like going for parties and all that, most of them do much of those things already, so it’s not really much of big jump of being an adult. But I can tell that here, in the Uk, the jump for them would be a lot more.

 In terms of financial responsibility, what do think about that with becoming an adult?

MA: Unlike when I was younger and didn’t have much pocket money so I didn’t have financial responsibilities but now my parents gave me a much bigger pocket, which I’m meant to use for like a whole term, which to be honest I haven’t used too wisely (he muses), but I’m trying my best. (He laughs) I feel like the older I get the more things will improve, I know the right thing to do: I’m supposed to have a savings account and a current account which I’m supposed to spend from, but I don’t have that yet, I’m still subject to spontaneous spending, so right now my financial responsibility isn’t at its best.

 In terms of relationships, have there been any changes for you as you become an adult?

MA: Well the last relationship I actually really had was in my last year in secondary school, and my others were outside of school, but they were nothing really serious. I haven’t had a serious relationship before, I don’t think I’m cut out for that yet, I don’t think I’m mature enough.

 With the current political and economic situation of Nigeria are you scared of becoming an adult in the emerging Nigeria?

MA: Yes. I’m scared cause I don’t want to get a really good degree and go back to Nigeria and not being able to get a good job. I also feel like I have to live up to my dad’s expectations, cause he told me that when he came out of university he had to struggle to get a good graduate job, so I feel like I have no excuse cause he didn’t have the good educational opportunities he has given me. Also, I can’t lie I’m partly driven by money, to be honest, I’m 100% driven by money (he laughs) so Nigeria’s economy has to improve abeg.

I also feel like I have to live up to my dad’s expectations, cause he told me that when he came out of university he had to struggle to get a good graduate job, so I feel like I have no excuse cause he didn’t have the good educational opportunities he has given me.

 One last question. If you could go back in time and give younger you advice on becoming a young adult what advice would you give?

MA: Well if I could go back in time I would advise myself to shoot every shot no matter the consequences, in terms of girls I liked, things I didn’t pay attention to ‘cause I felt I wasn’t good enough for. You only live once.

 Thanks so much.

MA: No problem.

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